There is a word that guides the decisions of many companies: profit. However, many entrepreneurs forget about another word as important as this one: “cost”. This term can define the business performance.

Because of this, it is common to see companies that are in a growing market and have a good margin of sales, but nevertheless, close their operations in a short period.

Usually, their managers didn’t do a good cost management. So, throughout this article, we will understand more about this subject. Enjoy your reading!

The purchasing process impacts your business performance

There are times when a company resembles a family. When parents are unemployed, they decide to reevaluate their spending, realizing how much unnecessary expenses they had.

In the case of companies, this also happens. When contact with suppliers is done automatically, without question, business performance is at stake.

Therefore, make sure that your purchasing department is determined to ensure the best suppliers for your company. This means, of course, searching for the best price, but mainly, for the best service.

In addition, map your spending. The entrepreneur must know how much each process costs the company. This is about understanding the value of these investments for the growth of the business.

Your costs should be part of a larger strategy

The costs vary according to the quantity of products produced, so the increase of production must be carefully done. Lack of strategy can cause the company to misinterpret the market numbers, generating losses. Containing enthusiasm is ideal in order to avoid a large stock of products.

Therefore, develop hypothetical scenarios that consider periods of increased production. By doing so, the company will have an idea of how much it can allocate for a possible increase of costs. In some cases, it’s possible to make this investment by minimizing risks. The replacement of process modernization makes the business reduce costs and gain efficiency.

Identifying the contribution margin is essential

The calculation is simple: contribution margin = sales price – direct costs. The sales price is expected to be higher than the direct costs – indeed, if possible, much higher! In some cases, this figure is not even enough to pay the indirect costs.

An example of this count occurs when a new product does not pay for itself. In this case, a leader in sales may have changed its price to cover the loss caused by a marketing failure of the company.

This type of maneuver can only be done when the company has already carried out studies on the contribution margin of its main products.

As we have seen in this article, business performance requires careful and efficient analysis of company numbers. Therefore, internal information must be stored, analyzed and published using management software – there is no room for amateurism.

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